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02 9663 5600
Concord
02 9744 5611
Miranda
02 9524 4999

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Floormania Blog

The Top 4 Causes of Hardwood Flooring Wear and Tear

Increase the Lifespan of your Hardwood Floors by Protecting Them from Wear & Tear

 

Hardwood floors are universally recognized as one of the longest-lasting flooring options.

When cared for properly, hardwood can last anywhere from 80-100 years. With just a little love and care, they can look as good as new decades after they were installed.

But active young children, heavy furniture, and large pets pose a threat to the beauty and longevity of your hardwood flooring.

To ensure you get the most out of your solid timber, we’ve compiled a comprehensive guide to protecting your floors from the common causes hardwood flooring wear and tear.

 

The 3 Top Causes of Wear to Hardwood Floors

 

Some things cause more damage to hardwood floors than others. These include:

 

1)     Water and Moisture:

 

Hardwood is incredibly sensitive to any amount of moisture. Even mopping with more than just a damp cloth can cause irreversible damage to a floor. Before setting out to clean your solid timber, read this post about things to avoid while cleaning hardwood flooring.

 

2)     Dirty Shoes

Although hardwood planks are protected by a thin finish, the dirt and debris left on the bottom of a shoe can easily damage the finish and create an abundance of small scratches throughout your floor.

Protect your floor from wear by ensuring shoes are not worn inside.

The moment your new timber planks are installed, it’s time to stop allowing shoes to be worn indoors. Place a shoe rack or mat by your door to encourage family members and guests to remove their footwear upon entering the home.

 

3)     Heavy Furniture

 

Heavy-set furniture like sofas, tables, and bookshelves can quickly scratch or dent your hardwood floor if proper steps aren’t taken. To prevent damage to your floor, try using area rugs or furniture glides on all furniture pieces.

 

4)     Young Children

 

Young children are full of energy. With so much fun to be had, the last thing on their mind is protecting new hardwood floors from scratches and water damage.

Protect your wood floor from accidental damage caused by young children using the following tips:

  • Avoid using the floor as a “road” for toys: Toys with wheels (like trains and cars) may seem innocent, but they can quickly scratch your floor even if they are light in weight.
  • Painting: Small drops of paint can easily find their way onto your floor. If you must use your floor as the stage for any arts and crafts, lay a large piece of newspaper or cloth down over the floor first.
  • Accidental Spills: As young children learn to use eating utensils, there are bound to be a few accidental spills during their learning curve. To protect your floors, encourage young children to sit while eating and drinking. Parents with toddlers who are transitioning from bottles to cups can use “sippy cups” to prevent spills.

 

By taking a little time each day to wipe-up small spills, remove your shoes before walking through the home, and monitoring the activities of young children, you can prevent hardwood flooring wear and tear and enjoy your floors for years to come.

For more information about caring for your hardwood floors, we recommend reading “The Ultimate Guide to Cleaning Hardwood Floors.” 

 

 

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